Does the OT speaks of a Bodily Resurrection?

C McC Mc Posts: 3,969

If it does, where in the OT where it speaks of Bodily Resurrection?

If it doesn't why not? What hope did the people of the OT had when it come to "life after death" (Resurrection)?

I am sure if does, the OT speaks of Bodily Resurrection the NT will affirm it? Where? CM

Comments

  • WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 3,368

    If it does, where in the OT where it speaks of Bodily Resurrection?

    I know of no place in the OT or NT that speaks of a physical body resurrection

    If it doesn't why not?

    Because there is no such resurrection

    What hope did the people of the OT had when it come to "life after death" (Resurrection)?

    They had the hope of resurrection at the end of that OT age, when resurrection became a reality. Before that time, all believers who died awaited the resurrection in the grave

    I am sure if does, the OT speaks of Bodily Resurrection the NT will affirm it? Where? CM

    See above ... neither OT nor NT speak of a physical resurrection to eternal life.

    Yes, there were people raised back to earthly life in their physical bodies in OT and NT times (cp. Elijah and son of a woman, Lazarus from Bethany, etc.) but these were not a resurrection to eternal life.

  • @C Mc If it does, where in the OT where it speaks of Bodily Resurrection?

    Daniel 12:1-4 (LEB) “Now at that time, Michael, the great prince, will arise, the protector over the sons of your people, and it will be a time of distress that has not been since your people have been a nation until that time. And at that time your people will escape, everyone who is found written in the scroll. And many from those sleeping in the dusty ground will awake, some to everlasting life and some to disgrace and everlasting contempt. But the ones having insight will shine like the brightness of the expanse, and the ones providing justice for the many will be like the stars forever and ever. But you, Daniel, keep the words secret and seal the scroll until the time of the end; many will run back and forth and knowledge will increase.”

    @C Mc I am sure if does, the OT speaks of Bodily Resurrection the NT will affirm it? Where?

    Revelation 20:11-15 (LEB) And I saw a great white throne and the one who was seated on it, from whose presence earth and heaven fled, and a place was not found for them. And I saw the dead—the great and the small—standing before the throne, and books were opened. And another book was opened, which is the book of life, and the dead were judged by what was written in the books, according to their deeds. And the sea gave up the dead who were in it, and Death and Hades gave up the dead who were in them, and each one was judged according to their deeds. And Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death—the lake of fire. And if anyone was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire.

    Keep Smiling [:)]

  • WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 3,368

    And where do these passages speak about / mention a physical bodily resurrection?

  • C McC Mc Posts: 3,969
    edited July 3

    @Wolfgang said:

    I know of no place in the OT or NT that speaks of a physical body resurrection.

    CM said:

    If it doesn't, why not? 

    @Wolfgang said:

    Because there is no such resurrection

    CM says:

    The resurrection of the dead became a widely accepted Jewish teaching in the Second-Temple period. it was the central pillar of their belief.

    Wolfgang, why you don't accept the most familiar Old Testament passage that refers to resurrection is Daniel 12:2? It states clearly as Keep_Smiling_4_Jesus posted above:

    “Many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake; Some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting contempt.”

    The thing that will wake up is the thing that is, when the person is dead, “sleeping” in the dust of the earth. Once again, Wolfgang, Isaiah 26:19 is very similar in its description of resurrection:

    “Your dead shall live; their bodies shall rise. You who dwell in the dust, awake and sing for joy! For your dew is a dew of light, and the earth will give birth to the dead.”

    The dead are said to now be in the dust, and from there, they shall rise. The bodies that are now dead will rise, and the earth will give up the dead that is in it. This was the consistent view of those Jews who believed in the resurrection. Throughout the Jewish literature on the resurrection up to and including the early to mid-first century AD, the resurrection was the resurrection of a dead body. In Sanhedrin 90b, Rabbi Gamaliel – Paul’s own teacher – explained how he knew that the dead would rise as follows:

    From the Torah: for it is written: ‘And the Lord said to Moses, Behold you shall sleep with your fathers; and this people will rise up’ [Deuteronomy 31:16]. From the Prophets: as it is written: ‘Your dead men shall live, together with my dead bodies shall they arise. Awake and sing, you that dwell in the dust; for your dew is as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out its dead.’ [Isaiah 26:19]; from the Writings: as it is written, ‘And the roof of your mouth, like the best wine of my beloved, like the best wine, that goes down sweetly, causing the lips of those who are asleep to speak’ [Song of Songs 7:9].

    Gamaliel thought the body would come back to life. The reference to Isaiah is fairly obvious in meaning, showing that Gamaliel thought of the reference to dead bodies rising up as a depiction of resurrection, and in the unusual reference to the Song of Songs, we see that Gamaliel believed that the lips of the dead would one day open and speak, giving us a clear insight into his view of the resurrection: The bodies that are now dead will one day be alive. Paul turned his back on much of what he had acquired in Pharisaism, but he held firmly to a bodily life after death. Paul publicly proclaimed that his belief in the resurrection is something he held in common with the Pharisees (Acts 23:6-10).

    See also passages from the Jewish literature current in the first century affirm this view of the resurrection. In a well-known story in 2 Maccabees chapter 7 (written in the late second century BC), a mother and her seven sons are tortured and killed because they would not break the law of God. The words of the third son reveal the way that the writer (as presumably his community) thought about the world to come:

    When it was demanded, he quickly put out his tongue and courageously stretched forth his hands [to be cut off], and said nobly, “I got these from heaven, and because of his laws I disdain them, and from him, I hope to get them back again.

    Or in 2 Baruch chapter 50, likely written towards the close of the first century AD:

    For the earth will certainly then restore the dead it now receives so as to preserve them: it will make no changes in their form, but as it has received them, so it will restore them, and as I delivered them to it, so also will it raise them. For those who are then alive must be shown that the dead have come to life again and that those who had departed have returned.

    Belief in the resurrection was not universal in first-century Judaism but it did exist. Wolfgang, you may want to reconsider your position on this matter. It's alright. While studying the Bible, sometimes we have to do this when greater understanding comes to light. CM

  • WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 3,368

    @C Mc Wolfgang, why you don't accept the most familiar Old Testament passage that refers to resurrection is Daniel 12:2?

    I DO ACCEPT the Dan 12:2 !!

    I don't see where it teaches a bodily (in a physical visible body) resurrection. It seems that most read "resurrection" or "resurrected from the dead" and automatically read into the text and interpret "bodily (in a physical visible body) resurrection".

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