man in the moon ....

WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 2,413

Hi folks,

the mystery about the man in the moon has been solved ...it was apparently the astronaut who was left behind to film the departure of the moon capsule .... see for yourself how he managed to follow the module up after it took off from the moon surface ...


Comments

  • reformedreformed Posts: 2,777

    I wonder about you....

  • WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 2,413

    I wonder about you....

    I am fine ... no need to wonder.

    Instead, you perhaps should wonder about what is being presented to you as the lift off from the moon and how it could have been filmed in the manner it was back in 1969 .... any ideas what that could be?

  • Bill_ColeyBill_Coley Posts: 1,949

    @Wolfgang posted:

    Instead, you perhaps should wonder about what is being presented to you as the lift off from the moon and how it could have been filmed in the manner it was back in 1969 .... any ideas what that could be?

    The video to which you linked, Wolfgang, is labeled as the Apollo 11 crew's lift-off from the lunar surface. That label is incorrect. There was NO filming of module take-offs from the lunar surface until Apollo 15, and the specific scene include in the video to which you linked is of the Apollo 17 crew's ascent. Any idea how your source got that VERY SIMPLE bit of information so wrong?

    As to how they filmed the Apollo 17 crew's lift-off from the lunar surface, a three minute Google search reminded me that it was essentially by earth-based remote control of a camera attached to the lunar rover, which of course was left on the moon, a remote control system that was not successful for Apollo 15 (a tilt mechanism on the camera failed) or 16 (the lunar rover was parked in wrong place) but succeeded much more for Apollo 17. You can read a bit of the story HERE.

    A stunning achievement, really. They planned the trajectory of the lunar module's ascent, parked the rover where it needed to be for the camera's view, sent commands from the earth a second or so in advance to account for the time delay created by distance to the moon, and the result was as we see.

  • WolfgangWolfgang Posts: 2,413

    A stunning achievement, really.

    As stunning an achievement as the program as a whole ...?

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