Favorite English Translation

What is your favorite English translation of the Bible and do you have any particular reason why?

Comments

  • GaoLuGaoLu Posts: 1,367
    edited September 2018
    I use different favorite versions for different reasons. I spend time wording things in various languages so like lots of simple ways to say things when working with speaking-translators.

    I cut my teeth on KJV. Many of its wordings are my favorite. I find it easy to memorize. I like the ESV for casual reading. Lenham or NASB for more digging. I seldom trust the NIV but like some wordings. Even the Message is good for that. For apocrypha I like NRSV. NKJV feels KJV-ish but has easier wording.

    I find that most older Asian Bible translations are based on the TR, so using a TR based English version during prep prevents saying things or excluding that are not in their Bible.

    [Jan...is the popular CB bible translation TR-based? I have taught there but don’t recall
  • Dave_LDave_L Posts: 2,328

    I use several translations, even paraphrases as commentaries. I think the KJV is good but some of the more recent translations, ESV, NET, etc. based on Nestle Aland 27 & 28 use Granville Sharp's rule that helps amplify the deity of Christ, where the KJV needs additional study to make it clear.

  • reformedreformed Posts: 2,268

    @Dave_L said:
    I use several translations, even paraphrases as commentaries. I think the KJV is good but some of the more recent translations, ESV, NET, etc. based on Nestle Aland 27 & 28 use Granville Sharp's rule that helps amplify the deity of Christ, where the KJV needs additional study to make it clear.

    What is Granville Sharp's rule?

  • Dave_LDave_L Posts: 2,328

    @reformed said:

    @Dave_L said:
    I use several translations, even paraphrases as commentaries. I think the KJV is good but some of the more recent translations, ESV, NET, etc. based on Nestle Aland 27 & 28 use Granville Sharp's rule that helps amplify the deity of Christ, where the KJV needs additional study to make it clear.

    What is Granville Sharp's rule?

    James White has some info on it here.

    http://www.aomin.org/aoblog/1991/01/01/granville-sharps-rule/

  • C_M_C_M_ Posts: 3,005

    @reformed said:

    @Dave_L said:
    I use several translations, even paraphrases as commentaries. I think the KJV is good but some of the more recent translations, ESV, NET, etc. based on Nestle Aland 27 & 28 use Granville Sharp's rule that helps amplify the deity of Christ, where the KJV needs additional study to make it clear.

    What is Granville Sharp's rule?

    Sharp’s rule, simply stated is:

    • "When two common, singular nouns in the same case are connected by “kai” (and) and there is an article in front of the first noun only, both nouns refer to the same person or thing".

    Compare Titus 2:13 in the KJV and the RSV:

    Looking for the blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ (KJV).

    Awaiting our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ (RSV).

    The wording of the KJV presents two Gods:

    (1) “the great God” and
    (2) “our Saviour Jesus Christ.”
    The RSV presents only one, “our great God and Savior Jesus Christ.”

    The RSV is following Sharp’s rule of Greek grammar and thus renders a clearer statement on the deity of Jesus. Truth found truth shared. CM

  • reformedreformed Posts: 2,268

    @C_M_ said:

    @reformed said:

    @Dave_L said:
    I use several translations, even paraphrases as commentaries. I think the KJV is good but some of the more recent translations, ESV, NET, etc. based on Nestle Aland 27 & 28 use Granville Sharp's rule that helps amplify the deity of Christ, where the KJV needs additional study to make it clear.

    What is Granville Sharp's rule?

    Sharp’s rule, simply stated is:

    • "When two common, singular nouns in the same case are connected by “kai” (and) and there is an article in front of the first noun only, both nouns refer to the same person or thing".

    Compare Titus 2:13 in the KJV and the RSV:

    Looking for the blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ (KJV).

    Awaiting our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ (RSV).

    The wording of the KJV presents two Gods:

    (1) “the great God” and
    (2) “our Saviour Jesus Christ.”
    The RSV presents only one, “our great God and Savior Jesus Christ.”

    The RSV is following Sharp’s rule of Greek grammar and thus renders a clearer statement on the deity of Jesus. Truth found truth shared. CM

    Thanks

  • reformedreformed Posts: 2,268

    The translation I use primarily is the ESV. I like the essential literalness of the translation but it isn't as clunky as the NASB.

    For devotional reading, I use the NIV and prefer the 1984 version.

    Most of my memorization as done as a kid in Awana and Christian School and was done in the KJV.

  • Complete Jewish Bible is my favorite English translation, which brings out Jewishness of Yeshua while avoiding "churchy" words that have negative connotations for synagogue use (provides reason to pause/ponder previously learned verses).

    KJV revision of Bishop's Bible has beautiful poetic expression. MEV (Modern English Version) is a recent English translation using TR.

    Note: all English translations are a commentary on the original text. English is not Hebrew/Aramaic nor Greek. Also translators have human filters (blinders) when translating: e.g. puzzling translations of plural Sabbaths into English singular.

    Keep Smiling :)

  • Bill_ColeyBill_Coley Posts: 1,422

    @Keep_Smiling_4_Jesus said:
    Complete Jewish Bible is my favorite English translation, which brings out Jewishness of Yeshua while avoiding "churchy" words that have negative connotations for synagogue use (provides reason to pause/ponder previously learned verses).

    Thanks for your contribution to this and other threads, and welcome to CD! I wish for you a blessed experience from your participation.

  • C_M_C_M_ Posts: 3,005
    edited December 2018

    Brethren,
    Help me out here. What's the quality of some of your listed favorite Bible translation?

    1. MEV (Modern English Version)
    2. ESV
    3. NASB
    4. NIV
    5. LEB
    6. NET
    7. NRSV
    8. NKJV
    9. AMP
    10. Complete Jewish Bible

    Namely:

    • What manuscripts are your favorites Bible translation based upon?
    • Who are the people behind your favorite Bible translations?

      • Do you know their names?
      • What are their biases or presuppositions?
      • How were people selected and what do they said that make their translation important, valuable and necessary?
      • What the general educational background of committee members?
    • Do you have or can you direct me to the preface of each of your favorites Bible translations?

    I know some information has been given above, but can we have it all? ;) CM

  • Faithlife Corporation offers all of the listed Bibles plus more on their web stores => https://www.logos.com and => https://verbum.com Logos.com search for Bibles => https://www.logos.com/products/search?Resource+Type=Bibles
    Lexham English Bible (LEB) is included in free basic packages (along with Reverse Interlinear, which is useful for Bible Study).

    Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) has an introduction that is worth reading. Logos community forum threads => Black Friday Sale - Jewish New Testament Commentary , => What is your primary English translation? , => Shem Qadosh Version , and => TLV is here!!! include snippets of CJB introduction.

    Google search site:community.logos.com smiling complete jewish introduction (especially images) was helpful to find Logos community threads: e.g. The Complete Jewish Bible vs The Jewish New Testament that includes Tanakh text used by David Stern for paraphrasing Old Covenant, which is intermixed with his own translation (hybrid not annotated).

    Keep Smiling [:)]

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