The Jesuit Origins of Futurism

Dave_LDave_L Posts: 2,130
edited August 30 in Apologetics

“The “Futurist School” interprets the language of the Apocalypse “literally,” except such symbols as are named as such, and holds that the whole of the Book, from the end of the third chapter, is yet “future” and unfulfilled, and that the greater part of the Book, from the beginning of chapter six to the end of chapter nineteen, describes what shall come to pass during the last week of “Daniel's Seventy Weeks.” This view, while it dates in modern times only from the close of the Sixteenth Century, is really the most ancient of the three. It was held in many of its prominent features by the primitive Fathers of the Church, and is one of the early interpretations of scripture truth that sunk into oblivion with the growth of Papacy, and that has been restored to the Church in these last times. In its present form it may be said to have originated at the end of the Sixteenth Century, with the Jesuit Ribera, who, actuated by the same motive as the Jesuit Alcazar, sought to rid the Papacy of the stigma of being called the “Antichrist,” and so referred the prophecies of the Apocalypse to the distant future.This view was accepted by the Roman Catholic Church and was for a long time confined to it, but, strange to say, it has wonderfully revived since the beginning of the Nineteenth Century, and that among Protestants.It is the most largely accepted of the three views. It has been charged with ignoring the Papal and Mohammedan systems, but this is far from the truth, for it looks upon them as fore shadowed in the scriptures, and sees in them the “Type” of those great “Anti-Types” yet future, the “Beast” and the “False Prophet.” The “Futurist” interpretation of scripture is the one employed in this book.” Dispensational Truth; pg. 5 Clarence Larkin

Post edited by Dave_L on

Comments

  • C_M_C_M_ Posts: 2,440
    edited August 30

    Dave,
    See my most recent post in your thread "Bible Scavenger Hunt". CM

    PS. Your OP cause one to ask a few questions for background understanding:

    1. Who are the Jesuits?
    2. Were they commissioned or volunteered to send up religious tracers to deflect?
    3. Do they have present-day influences?
    4. Are conducting such operations today?
    Post edited by C_M_ on
  • C_M_C_M_ Posts: 2,440

    Part-1 Who are the Jesuits?

    In view of the fact that the Jesuits are the most militant Catholic monastic order. Their leading university, The Pontifical Gregorian University. It is the leading Jesuit university, founded by Ignatius of Loyola 1551. It has been the alma mater of practically all the popes, cardinals and prelates of the Roman Catholic Church.

    Categories of Priests. It is useful for the reader to know one distinction in order to better understand the organization of the archdiocese. Most of the parishes in the archdiocese are under the direct control of the archbishop. They are staffed by diocesan priests (also called secular priests).

    These are a category of priests who are established by church law to have direct accountability to the Ordin­ary of the diocese. They are ordained for the service of that particular diocese and the usual expectation is that their whole career will be spent in that diocese.

    There is another category of priests called religious or "order" priests. These are members of religious communities, and although they too are under the immediate jurisdiction of the local Ordinary, they are under the jurisdiction of the religious superior of their order or community. These communities originated at various times in history and often have particular interests or apostolates, e.g. the Jesuits are primarily involved in the field of education. The primary tie of a member of a religious community is to that commun­ity rather than to a diocese or local bishop.

    Later for their work and mission. CM

    SOURCES:

    -- H. BOEHMER, THE JESUITS (TRANSLATION FROM THE GERMAN, PHILADELPHIA, CASTLE PRESS 1928).
    -- E. GOETHEIN, IGNATIUS LOYOLA AND THE GEGEN-REFORMATION (HALLE, 1895).
    -- T. CAMPBELL, THE JESUITS, 1534 1921 (NEW YORK, 1922).
    -- E. L. TAUNTON, THE HISTORY OF THE JESUITS IN ENGLAND, 1580-1773 (LONDON, 1901).

  • C_M_C_M_ Posts: 2,440
    edited October 30

    Part-2 Who are the Jesuits?

    "Throughout Christendom, Protestantism was menaced by formidable foes. The first triumphs of the Reformation past, Rome summoned new forces, hoping to accomplish its destruction. At this time the order of the Jesuits was created, the cruelest, unscrupulous, and powerful of all the champions of popery. Cut off from earthly ties and human interests, dead to the claims of natural affection, reason, and conscience wholly silenced, they knew no rule, no tie, but that of their order, and no duty but to extend its power. The gospel of Christ had enabled its adherents to meet danger and endure suffering, undismayed by cold, hunger, toil, and poverty, to uphold the banner of truth in face of the rack, the dungeon, and the stake. To combat these forces, Jesuitism inspired its followers with a fanaticism that enabled them to endure like dangers and to oppose to the power of truth all the weapons of deception. There was no crime too great for them to commit, no deception too base for them to practice, no disguise too difficult for them to assume. Vowed to perpetual poverty and humility, it was their studied aim to secure wealth and power, to be devoted to the overthrow of Protestantism, and the re-establishment of the papal supremacy".

    "When appearing as members of their order, they wore a garb of sanctity, visiting prisons and hospitals, ministering to the sick and the poor, professing to have renounced the world, and bearing the sacred name of Jesus, who went about doing good. But under this blameless exterior, the most criminal and deadly purposes were often concealed. It was a fundamental principle of the order that the end justifies the means. By this code, lying, theft, perjury, assassination, were not only pardonable but commendable, when they served the interests of the church. Under various disguises the Jesuits worked their way into offices of state, climbing up to be the counselors of kings, and shaping the policy of nations. They became servants to act as spies upon their masters. They established colleges for the sons of princes and nobles, and schools for the common people; and the children of Protestant parents were drawn into an observance of popish rites. All the outward pomp and display of the Romish worship was brought to bear to confuse the mind and dazzle and captivate the imagination, and thus the liberty for which the fathers had toiled and bled was betrayed by the sons. The Jesuits rapidly spread themselves over Europe, and wherever they went, there followed a revival of popery". GC 234-235

    ****** *********** *********** **********

    "Protestantism is not solely the outcome of human progress; it is no mere principle of perfectibility inherent in humanity, and ranking as one of its native powers, in virtue of which when society becomes corrupt it can purify itself, and when it is arrested in its course by some external force or stops from exhaustion, it can recruit its energies and set forward anew on its path. It is neither the product of the individual reason nor the result of the joint thought and energies of the species. Protestantism is a principle which has its origin outside human society: it is a Divine graft on the intellectual and moral nature of man, whereby new vitalities and forces are introduced into it, and the human stem yields henceforth a nobler fruit. It is the descent of a heaven-born influence which allies itself with all the instincts and powers of the individual, with all the laws and cravings of society, and which, quickening both the individual and the social being into a new life, and directing their efforts to nobler objects, permits the highest development of which humanity is capable, and the fullest possible accomplishment of all its grand ends. In a word, Protestantism is revived Christianity" (See HISTORY OF PROTESTANTISM)

    What are the four vows of the Jesuits? CM

    SOURCES:

    -- Wylie. HISTORY OF PROTESTANTISM pg 295
    -- THE ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA (9TH ED.), ART. "JESUITS".
    -- C. PAROISSEN, THE PRINCIPLES OF THE JESUITS, DEVELOPED IN A COLLECTION OF EXTRACTS FROM THEIR OWN AUTHORS (LONDON, 1860--AN EARLIER EDITION APPEARED IN 1839).
    -- W. C. CARTWRIGHT, THE JESUITS, THEIR CONSTITUTION AND TEACHING (LONDON, 1876).

    Post edited by C_M_ on
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